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Overworked and Underappreciated at Work? Here’s Your Survival Guide

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Have you ever felt like you were being taken advantage of at work?

Well, welcome to corporate America.

Unless you work at a notoriously employee-friendly company such as Google or Zappos, you need to accept that the company you work for may be more interested in the bottom line than your happiness.

In an ideal world, you’d be recognized for all your awesomeness. They’d erect monuments in your honor for getting that report turned around on such a tight deadline. Do they know how hard you worked on that stinking report?

But this is the real world, and you’re going to have to fight off demanding bosses, difficult coworkers and your own bad habits. (Click here to tweet this thought.)

Here’s how you can survive in a company that’s looking out for number one — and how to know when it’s time to call it quits.

1. Stop looking for recognition

This is a tough but vital strategy for surviving a thankless job. There will be times when your job requires you to work early and stay late, come in on weekends and perform duties beyond what your job description covers. Just do it.

If you need to complete a big project or prepare for a major event or presentation, it’s in your best interest to suck it up and get it done. Sometimes being extraordinary is considered a requirement, and you’ve got to accept that you shouldn’t expect a round of applause for every extra task you complete.

2. Don’t be a pushover

When you’re passionate about what you do and you do it with friendly people in a happy environment, you tend to be more committed without expecting anything in return.

Excitement and engagement are good for your career and your health, but make sure you draw a line between the habit and the exception. If you’re routinely being asked to commit more time than is fair to ask, you have every right to communicate your feelings and negotiate something in return (like a raise or a promotion).

Remember, it’s up to you to communicate your needs and expectations.

When to call it quits:There’s a difference between being overworked and being exploited. Calling you in repeatedly on your day off without notice and/or asking you to perform tasks that make you uncomfortable are good reasons to look for opportunities elsewhere.

3. Watch for workplace hazards

If you’re unlucky, you might work with someone who’s actively trying to set you up for failure. This person might take credit for hard work that you did or throw you under the bus when you least expect it.

First, err on the side of generosity. It’s possible that this person is overwhelmed with personal or professional issues and being inconsiderate without realizing it.

But if your coworker’s behavior is clearly antagonistic, put this person on your radar as a workplace hazard. Do your best to minimize your interactions with him or her.

Read more: Overworked and Underappreciated at Work? Here’s Your Survival Guide

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